"Extreme poverty anywhere is a threat to human security everywhere." Kofi Annan, Seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations
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1804 Institute

Welcome to 1804 Institute, an organization dedicated in reducing poverty in marginalized communities in America and the Caribbean. True to our mission, our goals consist in:

  • Strengthening decision-making by providing or suggesting research based policies and programs with consideration of local values and traditions.
  • Providing in depth research and analyses to support businesses, policy-makers and social ventures
Perception & Accountability in Haiti Maroonage in Haiti: The Haitian Perspective

Perception

ABSTRACT

This study aims to inform the debate regarding transparency and accountability in Haiti’s public institutions. The research focuses exclusively on the perceptions of local Haitians and how they believe that Haiti’s development can be impacted by more or less transparency and accountability in its public affairs. Drawing on the findings from a prior study, a modified interview questionnaire, and other recent documentation, this article demonstrates that local Haitians want greater transparency and accountability measures; however, they have a negative perception about the ability and willingness of the local government to enforce these measures. In one case, for instance, results show that general perceptions are getting worse due to a lack of confidence in Haiti’s leaders. In another case, results show that the current administration may benefit from a slightly higher degree of confidence than the Martelly-Lamothe’s administration. By and large, the findings expose the complexity of implementing these practices in Haiti’s institutions while revealing some sort of hesitation about how to move ahead.

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Author: Prospere Charles, PhD

Perception

ABSTRACT

Maroonage is a way of life that is as mysterious and misunderstood in today's society as it was in the 1500's. In Ayiti, contrary to popular belief, historical evidence suggest that Maroonage did not initially start with Black Africans, although the enslaved people from Africa ultimately perfected it. Bartolome de Las Casas, a Spanish Priest who saw firsthand and wrote extensively about the indigenous people in the Caribbean, reported that the natives, called the Tainos for some or the Arawaks for others when faced with forced labors, cruel and inhuman treatments from the settlers, would have started timidly the
maroonage movement.

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Author: Prospere Charles, PhD

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